PART-66 /JAR-66.A.30 Experience Requirements

(a) An applicant for an PART-66 /JAR-66 Aircraft Maintenance Licence shall have acquired:

1. for PART-66 category A and subcategories B1.2 and B1.4:

three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or
two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or
one year of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part-147 approved basic training course.

2. for PART-66 category B2 and subcategories B1.1 and B1.3:
five years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or
three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or
two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part -147 approved basic training course.

3. for PART-66 category C with respect to large aircraft:

three years of experience exercising category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft or as Part-145 B1.1, B1.3 or B2 support staff, or, a combination of both; or
five years of experience exercising category B1.2 or B1.4 privileges on large aircraft or as Part-145 B1.2 or B1.4 support staff, or a combination of both; or

4. for category C with respect to non large aircraft:

three years of experience exercising category B1 or B.2 privileges on non large aircraft or as Part-145 B1 or B.2 support staff, or a combination of both; or

5. for category C obtained through the academic route:

an applicant holding an academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational institution recognized by the competent authority, three years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including six months of observation of base maintenance tasks.

(b)    An applicant for an extension to an PART-66 /JAR-66 Aircraft Maintenance Licence shall have a minimum civil aircraft maintenance experience requirement appropriate to the additional category or subcategory of Licence applied for as defined in Appendix IV to this Part.

(c)    For category A, B1 and B2 the experience must be practical which means being involved with a representative cross section of maintenance tasks on aircraft.

(d)    For all applicants, at least one year of the required experience must be recent maintenance experience on aircraft of the category/subcategory for which the initial PART-66 /JAR-66 Aircraft Maintenance Licence is sought. For subsequent category/subcategory additions to an existing PART-66 /JAR-66 Aircraft Maintenance License, the additional recent maintenance experience required may be less than one year, but must be at least three months. The required experience must be dependent upon the difference between the Licence category/subcategory held and applied for. Such additional experience must be typical of the new Licence category/subcategory sought.

(e)    Notwithstanding paragraph (a), aircraft maintenance experience gained outside a civil aircraft maintenance environment shall be accepted when such maintenance is equivalent to that required by this Part as established by the competent authority. Additional experience of civil aircraft maintenance shall, however, be required to ensure understanding of the civil aircraft maintenance environment.

General Information about the EASA part 66 Licence!

General Information about the EASA part 66 Licence!

(Part-66)  66.1
For the purpose of this Part, the competent authority shall be the authority designated by the Member State to whom a
person applies for the issuance of an aircraft maintenance licence.
SECTION A
SUBPART A
AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE LICENCE AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS
66.A.1 Scope
(a) This section establishes the requirements for the issue of an aircraft maintenance licence and conditions of its validity
and use, for aeroplanes and helicopters of the following categories:
— Category A
— Category B1
— Category B2
— Category C
(b) Categories A and B1 are subdivided into subcategories relative to combinations of aeroplanes, helicopters, turbine
and piston engines. The subcategories are:
— A1 and B1.1 Aeroplanes Turbine
— A2 and B1.2 Aeroplanes Piston
— A3 and B1.3 Helicopters Turbine
— A4 and B1.4 Helicopters Piston
66.A.10 Application
An application for an aircraft maintenance licence or amendment to such licence shall be made on EASA Form 19 and
in a manner established by the competent authority and submitted thereto. An application for the amendment to an
aircraft maintenance licence shall be made to the competent authority that issued the aircraft maintenance licence.
66.A.15 Eligibility
An applicant for an aircraft maintenance licence shall be at least 18 years of age.
66.A.20 Privileges
(a) Subject to compliance with paragraph (b), the following privileges shall apply:
1. A category A aircraft maintenance licence permits the holder to issue certificates of release to service following
minor scheduled line maintenance and simple defect rectification within the limits of tasks specifically endorsed
on the authorisation. The certification privileges shall be restricted to work that the licence holder has personally
performed in a Part-145 organisation.
2. A category B1 aircraft maintenance licence shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service
following maintenance, including aircraft structure, powerplant and mechanical and electrical systems. Replacement
of avionic line replaceable units, requiring simple tests to prove their serviceability, shall also be included in
the privileges. Category B1 shall automatically include the appropriate A subcategory.
3. A category B2 aircraft maintenance licence shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service
following maintenance on avionic and electrical systems.
4. A category C aircraft maintenance licence shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service
following base maintenance on aircraft. The privileges apply to the aircraft in its entirety in a Part-145 organisation.
(b) The holder of an aircraft maintenance licence may not exercise certification privileges unless:
1. in compliance with the applicable requirements of Part-M and/or Part-145.
2. in the preceding two-year period he/she has, either had six months of maintenance experience in accordance with
the privileges granted by the aircraft maintenance licence or, met the provision for the issue of the appropriate
privileges.
3. he/she is able to read, write and communicate to an understandable level in the language(s) in which the technical
documentation and procedures necessary to support the issue of the certificate of release to service are written.
66.A.25 Basic knowledge requirements
(a) An applicant for an aircraft maintenance licence or the addition of a category or subcategory to such an aircraft
maintenance licence shall demonstrate, by examination, a level of knowledge in the appropriate subject modules in
accordance with Appendix I to this Part.
The basic knowledge examinations shall be conducted by a training organisation appropriately approved under Part-
147 or by the competent authority.
(b) Full or partial credit against the basic knowledge requirements and associated examination shall be given for any
other technical qualification considered by the competent authority to be equivalent to the knowledge standard of
this Part. Such credits shall be established in accordance with Section B, Subpart E of this Part.
66.A.30 Experience requirements
(a) An applicant for an aircraft maintenance licence shall have acquired:
1. for category A and subcategories B1.2 and B1.4:
(i) three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant
technical training; or
(ii) two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered
relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or
(iii) one year of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part-147 approved
basic training course.
2. for category B2 and subcategories B1.1 and B1.3:
(i) five years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft if the applicant has no previous relevant
technical training; or
(ii) three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered
relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or
(iii) two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part -147 approved
basic training course.
3. for category C with respect to large aircraft:
(i) three years of experience exercising category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft or as Part-145 B1.1,
B1.3 or B2 support staff, or, a combination of both; or
(ii) five years of experience exercising category B1.2 or B1.4 privileges on large aircraft or as Part-145 B1.2 or
B1.4 support staff, or a combination of both; or
4. for category C with respect to non large aircraft:
three years of experience exercising category B1 or B.2 privileges on non large aircraft or as Part-145 B1 or B.2
support staff, or a combination of both; or
5. for category C obtained through the academic route:
an applicant holding an academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational
institution recognised by the competent authority, three years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance
environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including
six months of observation of base maintenance tasks.
(b) An applicant for an extension to an aircraft maintenance licence shall have a minimum civil aircraft maintenance
experience requirement appropriate to the additional category or subcategory of licence applied for as defined in
Appendix IV to this Part.
(c) For category A, B1 and B2 the experience must be practical which means being involved with a representative cross
section of maintenance tasks on aircraft.
(d) For all applicants, at least one year of the required experience must be recent maintenance experience on aircraft of
the category/subcategory for which the initial aircraft maintenance licence is sought. For subsequent category/subcategory
additions to an existing aircraft maintenance licence, the additional recent maintenance experience required
may be less than one year, but must be at least three months. The required experience must be dependent upon the
difference between the licence category/subcategory held and applied for. Such additional experience must be typical
of the new licence category/subcategory sought.
(e) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), aircraft maintenance experience gained outside a civil aircraft maintenance environment
shall be accepted when such maintenance is equivalent to that required by this Part as established by the
competent authority. Additional experience of civil aircraft maintenance shall, however, be required to ensure understanding
of the civil aircraft maintenance environment.
66.A.40 Continued validity of the aircraft maintenance licence
(a) The aircraft maintenance licence becomes invalid five years after its last issue or amendment, unless the holder
submits his/her aircraft maintenance licence to the competent authority that issued it, in order to verify that the
information contained in the licence is the same as that contained in the competent authority records, pursuant to
66. B.120.
(b) Any certification privileges based upon a aircraft maintenance licence becomes invalid as soon as the aircraft maintenance
licence is invalid.
(c) The aircraft maintenance licence is only valid when issued and/or amended by the competent authority and when
the holder has signed the document.
66.A.45 Type/task training and ratings
(a) The holder of a category A aircraft maintenance licence may only exercise certification privileges on a specific
aircraft type following the satisfactory completion of the relevant category A aircraft task training carried out by an
appropriately approved Part-145 or Part-147 organisation. The training shall include practical hands on training and
theoretical training as appropriate for each task authorised. Satisfactory completion of training shall be demonstrated
by an examination and/or by workplace assessment carried out by an appropriately approved Part-145 or Part-147
organisation.
(b) Except as otherwise specified in paragraph (g), the holder of a category B1, B2 or C aircraft maintenance licence shall
only exercise certification privileges on a specific aircraft type when the aircraft maintenance licence is endorsed with
the appropriate aircraft type rating.
(c) Except as otherwise specified in paragraph (h), ratings shall be granted following satisfactory completion of the relevant
category B1, B2 or C aircraft type training approved by the competent authority or conducted by an appropriately
approved Part-147 maintenance training organisation.
(d) Category B1 and B2 approved type training shall include theoretical and practical elements and consist of the appropriate
course in relation to the 66.A.20(a) privileges. Theoretical and practical training shall comply with Appendix
III to this Part.
(e) Category C approved type training shall comply with Appendix III to this Part. In the case of a category C person
qualified by holding an academic degree as specified in 66.A.30(a), (5), the first relevant aircraft type theoretical
training shall be at the category B1 or B2 level. Practical training is not required.
(f) Completion of approved aircraft type training, as required by paragraphs (b) to (e), shall be demonstrated by an
examination. The examination shall comply with Appendix III to this Part. The examinations in respect of category
B1 or B2 or C aircraft type ratings shall be conducted by training organisations appropriately approved under Part-
147, the competent authority, or the training organisation conducting the approved type training course.
(g) Notwithstanding paragraph (b), for aircraft other than large aircraft, the holder of a category B1 or B2 aircraft maintenance
licence may also exercise certification privileges, when the aircraft maintenance licence is endorsed with the
appropriate group ratings, or manufacturer group ratings, unless the Agency has determined that the complexity of
the aircraft in question requires a type rating.
1. Manufacturer group ratings may be granted after complying with the type rating requirements of two aircraft
types representative of the group from the same manufacturer.
2. Full group ratings may be granted after complying with the type rating requirements of three aircraft types representative
of the group from different manufacturers. However, no full group rating may be granted to B1 multiple
turbine engine aeroplanes, where only manufacturer group rating applies.
3. The groups shall consist of the following:
(i) for category B1 or C:
— helicopter piston engine
— helicopter turbine engine
— aeroplane single piston engine — metal structure
— aeroplane multiple piston engines — metal structure
— aeroplane single piston engine — wooden structure
— aeroplane multiple piston engines — wooden structure
— aeroplane single piston engine — composite structure
— aeroplane multiple piston engines — composite structure
— aeroplane turbine — single engine
— aeroplane turbine — multiple engine
(ii) for category B2 or C:
— aeroplane
— helicopter
(h) Notwithstanding paragraph (c), ratings on aircraft other than large aircraft may also be granted, subject to satisfactory
completion of the relevant category B1, B2 or C aircraft type examination and demonstration of practical
experience on the aircraft type, unless the Agency has determined that the aircraft is complex, where paragraph 3
approved type training is required.
In the case of a category C ratings on aircraft other than large aircraft, for a person qualified by holding an academic
degree as specified in 66.A.30 (a), (5), the first relevant aircraft type examination shall be at the category B1 or B2
level.
1. Category B1, B2 and C approved type examinations must consist of a mechanical examination for category B1
and an avionics examination for category B2 and both mechanical and avionics examination for category C.
2. The examination shall comply with Appendix III to this Part. The examination shall be conducted by training
organisations appropriately approved under Part-147, or by the competent authority.
3. Aircraft type practical experience shall include a representative cross section of maintenance activities relevant to
the category.
66.A.70 Conversion provisions
(a) The holder of a certifying staff qualification valid in a Member State, prior to the date of entry into force of this Part
shall be issued an aircraft maintenance licence without further examination subject to the conditions specified in
66.B.300.
(b) A person undergoing a qualification process valid in a Member State, prior to the date of entry into force of this Part
may continue to be qualified. The holder of a qualification gained following such qualification process shall be issued
an aircraft maintenance licence without further examination subject to the conditions specified in 66.B.300
(c) Where necessary, the aircraft maintenance licence shall contain technical limitations in relation to the scope of the
pre-existing qualification.
SUBPART B
AIRCRAFT OTHER THAN AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS
66.A.100 General
Until such time as this Part specifies a requirement for certifying staff of aircraft other than aeroplanes and helicopters,
the relevant Member State regulation shall apply.
SUBPART C
COMPONENTS
66.A.200 General
Until such time as this Part specifies a requirement for certifying components, the relevant Member State regulation shall
apply.

SECTION B
PROCEDURE FOR COMPETENT AUTHORITIES
SUBPART A
GENERAL
66.B.05 Scope
This section establishes the administrative requirements to be followed by the competent authorities in charge of the
application and the enforcement of Section A of this Part.
66.B.10 Competent authority
(a) General
A Member State shall designate a competent authority with allocated responsibilities for the issuance, continuation,
amendment, suspension or revocation of licences. This competent authority shall establish documented procedures
and an organisational structure.
(b) Resources
The competent authority shall be appropriately staffed to carry out the requirements of this Part.
(c) Procedures
The competent authority shall establish procedures detailing how compliance with this Part is accomplished.
The procedures shall be reviewed and amended to ensure continued compliance.
66.B.15 Acceptable means of compliance
The Agency shall develop acceptable means of compliance that the Member States may use to establish compliance with
this Part. When the acceptable means of compliance are complied with, the related requirements of this Part shall be
considered as met.
66.B.20 Record-keeping
(a) The competent authority shall establish a system of record-keeping that allows adequate traceability of the process
to issue, revalidate, amend, suspend or revoke each aircraft maintenance licence.
(b) The records for the oversight of the Part shall include:
1. the application for an aircraft maintenance licence or change to that licence, including all supporting documentation;
2. a copy of the aircraft maintenance licence including any changes;
3. copies of all relevant correspondence;
4. details of any exemption and enforcement actions;
5. any report from other competent authorities relating to the aircraft maintenance licence holder;
6. records of examinations conducted by the competent authority;
7. aircraft maintenance licence conversion reports;
8. examination credit reports.
(c) Records referred to in paragraph (b), 1. to 5. shall be kept at least five years after the end of the licence validity.
(d) Records referred to in paragraph (b), 6. shall be kept at least five years.
(e) Records referred to in paragraph (b), 7. and 8. shall be kept for an unlimited period.
66.B.25 Mutual exchange of information
(a) In order to contribute to the improvement of air safety, the competent authorities shall participate in a mutual
exchange of all necessary information in accordance with Article 11 of the basic Regulation.
(b) Without prejudice to the competencies of the Member States, in the case of a potential safety threat involving several
Member States, the concerned competent authorities shall assist each other in carrying out the necessary oversight
action.

66.B.30 Exemptions
All exemptions granted in accordance with Article 10, 3. of the basic Regulation shall be recorded and retained by the
competent authority.
SUBPART B
ISSUE OF AN AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE LICENCE
This Subpart provides the procedures to be followed by the competent authority to issue or vary or to permit continuity
of the aircraft maintenance licence.
66.B.100 Procedure for the issue of an aircraft maintenance licence by the competent authority
(a) On receipt of EASA Form 19 and any supporting documentation, the competent authority shall verify EASA Form
19 for completeness and ensure that the experience claimed meets the requirement of this Part.
(b) The competent authority shall verify an applicant’s examination status and/or confirm the validity of any credits to
ensure that all required modules of Appendix 1 have been met as required by this Part.
(c) When satisfied that the applicant meets the standards of knowledge and experience required by this Part, the competent
authority shall issue the relevant aircraft maintenance licence to the applicant. The same information shall be
kept on competent authority file.
66.B.105 Procedure for the issue of an aircraft maintenance licence via the Part-145 approved maintenance
organisation
(a) A Part-145 maintenance organisation which has been authorised to carry out this activity by the competent
authority may prepare the aircraft maintenance licence on behalf of the competent authority or make recommendations
to the competent authority regarding the application from an individual for a aircraft maintenance licence so
that the competent authority may prepare and issue such licence.
(b) The Part-145 maintenance organisation shall ensure compliance with 66.B.100 (a) and (b). In all cases, the competent
authority shall issue the aircraft maintenance licence to the applicant.
66.B.110 Procedure for the amendment of an aircraft maintenance licence to include an additional basic category
or subcategory
(a) In addition to the documents required under 66.B.100 or 66.B.105, as appropriate, the applicant for additional basic
categories or subcategories to an aircraft maintenance licence shall submit his/her current original aircraft maintenance
licence to the competent authority together with EASA Form 19.
(b) At the completion of the procedure as specified in 66.B.100 or 66.B.105, the competent authority shall endorse the
additional basic category or subcategory on the aircraft maintenance licence by stamp and signature or reissue the
licence. The competent authority file shall be amended accordingly.
(c) Where the applicant for amendment of the basic categories qualifies for such variation via 66.B.100 in a Member
State other than the Member State in which he/she first qualified, the application shall be sent to the Member State
of first qualification.
(d) Where the applicant for amendment of the basic categories qualifies for such variation via 66.B.105 in a Member
State other than the Member State in which he/she first qualified, the Part-145 approved maintenance organisation
shall send the aircraft maintenance licence together with EASA Form 19 to the Member State of first qualification
for Member State stamp and signature of the amendment or reissue of the licence.
66.B.115 Procedure for the amendment of an aircraft maintenance licence to include an aircraft type or group
On receipt of a satisfactory EASA Form 19 and any supporting documentation demonstrating compliance with the
applicable type rating and/or group rating requirements and the accompanying aircraft maintenance licence, the competent
authority shall either endorse the applicant’s aircraft maintenance licence with the aircraft type or group or reissue
the said licence to include the aircraft type or group. The competent authority file shall be amended accordingly.

66.B.120 Procedure for the renewal of an aircraft maintenance licence validity
(a) The holder of an aircraft maintenance licence shall complete the relevant parts of EASA Form 19 and submit it with
the holder’s copy of the licence to the competent authority that issued the original aircraft maintenance licence,
unless the Part-145 approved maintenance organisation has a procedure in its exposition whereby such organisation
may submit the necessary documentation on behalf of the aircraft maintenance licence holder.
(b) The competent authority shall compare the holder’s aircraft maintenance licence with the competent authority file
and verify any pending revocation, suspension or variation action pursuant to 66.B.500. If the documents are identical
and no action is pending pursuant to 66. B.500, the holder’s copy shall be renewed for five years and the file
endorsed accordingly.
(c) If the competent authority file is different from the aircraft maintenance licence held by the licence holder:
1. the competent authority shall investigate the reasons for such differences and may choose not to renew the
aircraft maintenance licence.
2. the competent authority shall inform both the licence holder and any known Part-145 or Part-M approved maintenance
organisation affected of such fact and shall, if necessary, take action under paragraph 66.B.155 to revoke,
suspend or amend the licence in question.
SUBPART C
EXAMINATIONS
This Subpart provides the procedure for examinations conducted by the competent authority.
66.B.200 Examination by the competent authority
(a) All examination questions shall be kept in a secure manner prior to an examination, to ensure that candidates will
not know which particular questions will form the basis of the examination. The competent authority shall nominate
those persons who control the questions to be used for each examination.
(b) The competent authority shall appoint examiners who shall be present during all examinations to ensure the integrity
of the examination.
(c) Basic examinations shall follow the standard specified in Appendix I and II to this Part.
(d) Type examinations must follow the standard specified in Appendix III to this Part.
(e) New essay questions shall be raised at least every six months and used questions withdrawn or rested from use. A
record of the questions used shall be retained in the records for reference.
(f) All examination papers shall be handed out at the start of the examination to the candidate and handed back to the
examiner at the end of the allotted examination time period. No examination paper may be removed from the examination
room during the allotted examination time period.
(g) Apart from specific documentation needed for type examinations, only the examination paper may be available to
the candidate during the examination.
(h) Examination candidates shall be separated from each other so that they cannot read each other’s examination papers.
They may not speak to any person other than the examiner.
(i) Candidates who are proven to be cheating shall be banned from taking any further examination within 12 months
of the date of the examination in which they were found cheating.

SUBPART D
CONVERSION OF NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS
This Subpart provides the requirements for converting national qualifications to aircraft maintenance licences.
66.B.300 General
(a) The competent authority may only perform the conversion specified in 66.A.70 in accordance with a conversion
report prepared pursuant to paragraph 66.B.305 or 66.B.310, as applicable.
(b) The conversion report shall be either developed by the competent authority or approved by the competent
authority.
L 315/80 EN Official Journal of the European Union 28.11.2003
66.B.305 Conversion report for national qualifications
The report shall describe the scope of each type of qualification and show to which aircraft maintenance licence it will
be converted, which limitation will be added and the Part-66 module/subjects on which examination is needed to ensure
conversion to the aircraft maintenance licence without limitation, or to include an additional (sub-) category. The report
shall include a copy of the existing regulation defining the licence categories and scopes.
66.B.310 Conversion report for approved maintenance organisations authorisations
For each approved maintenance organisation concerned, the report shall describe the scope of each type of authorisation
and show to which aircraft maintenance licence it will be converted, which limitation will be added and the module/
subjects on which examination is needed to convert to the licence, or to include an additional (sub-)category. The report
shall include a copy of the relevant approved maintenance organisation’s procedures for the qualification of certifying
staff, on which the conversion process is based.
SUBPART E
EXAMINATION CREDITS
This Subpart provides the requirements for granting examination credits in accordance with 66.A.25(b).
66.B.400 General
(a) The competent authority may only grant examination credit on the basis of an examination credit report prepared
in accordance with 66.B.405.
(b) The examination credit report must be either developed by the competent authority or approved by the competent
authority.
66.B.405 Examination credit report
(a) For each technical qualification concerned the report shall identify the subject matter and knowledge levels contained
in Appendix I to this Part relevant to the particular category being compared.
(b) The report shall include a statement of compliance against each subject stating where, in the technical qualification,
the equivalent standard can be found. If there is no equivalent standard for the particular subject, the report shall
state such facts.
(c) Based upon paragraph (b) comparison, the report shall indicate for each technical qualification concerned the
Appendix I subject matters subject to examination credits.
(d) Where the national qualification standard is changed, the report shall be amended as necessary.

 

EASA to order A300 operators to fit rudder-reversal alarms

Airbus A300 and A310 operators will be instructed to fit a warning device designed to prevent crews from making potentially hazardous rudder inputs of the kind that brought down an American Airlines jet 10 years ago.

The accident occurred on 12 November 2001, when the A300′s vertical fin broke away as flight AA587 climbed out of New York Kennedy airport.

Investigators found that the pilot commanded a series of five heavy rudder inputs, alternately deflecting the rudder in one direction then the other, intending to counter a roll disturbance induced by wake turbulence. These rudder reversals exerted excessive loads on the fin and it sheared off.

While the sequential rudder inputs were “unexpected” and “non-conventional”, the European Aviation Safety Agency said, the results of a pilot survey published at the end of 2010 indicated that the rudder “is still reported to be used or considered for use by pilots in ways they have not been trained”.

It added that the actions “sometimes contradict” industry guidance on aircraft upset recovery.

EASA has approved a design change involving installation of a “stop rudder inputs” warning system, and is proposing to order A300-600 and A310 operators to fit the device within four years.

The equipment monitors rudder inputs and triggers both aural and visual warnings if it detects a single “dangerous” rudder doublet.

EASA said it is still co-operating with the US Federal Aviation Administration to determine whether, and to what extent, certification standards for large transport aircraft can be amended to take into account possible excessive use of the rudder.

Studying in Australia

Why Study In Australia?
Here is a list of reasons that our students have chosen to study in Australia.
LIFESTYLE – Australia is famous for its fresh, active, relaxed lifestyle. Choose from quiet countryside locations to busy inner-cities.
SAFETY – Australia is safe from most world threats and environmental dangers such as earthquakes. Carrying guns is prohibited.
CLEAN – Australia enjoys very low levels of pollution and has extremely clean air, roads, parks and beaches.
MODERN – The infrastructure, education, services, communications systems and lifestyle are very progressive and modern.
NATURAL BEAUTY – Australia has among the most spectacular, beautiful natural features, forests and beaches in the world.
MULTICULTURAL – Our mixture of cultures, foods and religions makes Australia the most multicultural country in the world.
LANGUAGE – Neutral English is the national language and is well taught and understood throughout the country.
SUPPORT – Australia supports overseas visiting students in many ways including special laws and institutional services.

Education in Australia for visitors from overseas is highly regulated and controlled by the Australian government to ensure the highest possible level of quality and service. The majority of our programmes including Flight Attendant, Cabin Crew, AirlinePilot and Aviation Engineer programmes are within the university and VET education systems. This page will assist you to learn more about Australian education (the education system in Australia).

Universities
There are forty-three Australian universities. They are teaching and research institutions. A full range of academic and professional disciplines is offered with awards ranging from associate diplomas to doctorates.
Many universities have a multi-campus structure, with each campus specialising in particular disciplines. Regional universities, some offering specialised courses, provide a full tertiary experience with students residing on campus and participating in local activities. The standard, design and diversity of education offered by Australian universities are among the most effective in the world. Typically an undergraduate degree takes at least three years to complete, longer for honours or double degrees. For more information on Australian universities, please ask your Aviation Education Centre counsellor.

Vocational ( “technical & further” ) Education
Vocational Education and Training (VET) / Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutions, such as Aviation Australia provide courses with a strong vocational focus and application such as aircraft engineering, travel, tourism, graphic design and many others. Fees are charged for these courses and vary between institutions and states. Some VET / TAFE courses are offered at degree level with the majority being at diploma or associate diploma level. For more information on the VET / TAFE system and tuition fees, please ask your Aviation Education Centre counsellor.

The ESOS Act
The provision of education and training services to overseas students in Australia is regulated by the Department of Education, Science and Training through the “Education Services for Overseas Students Act” and associated legislation. The purpose of the legislation is to protect the interests of people coming to Australia on student visas, by providing tuition and financial assurance and by ensuring a nationally consistent approach to provider registration. The legislation also seeks to ensure the integrity of the industry through visa-related reporting requirements. Under an established “Code of Practice” education providers in Australia are required to provide a consistant, high level of education and support to international students.

Aviation Engineering & Aerospace Sciences modules listed

Diploma of Aircraft Maintenance Engineering – Mechanical

Content:
Module 1 – Mathematics
Module 2 – Physics
Module 3 – Electrical Fundamentals
Module 4 – Electronic Fundamentals
Module 5 – Digital Techniques/ Electronic Instrument Systems
Module 6 – Aircraft Materials and Hardware
Module 7 – Maintenance Practices
Module 8 – Basic Aerodynamics
Module 9 – Human Factors
Module 10 – Aviation Legislation
Module 11 – Aeroplane Aerodynamics Structures and Systems
Module 15 – Gas Turbine Engines
Module 17 – Propeller
Module AA-02 Aviation English (as required)
Module AA15 – New Supervisor

Dual Diploma of Aircraft Maintenance Engineering – Mechanical + Avionics


Content:
Module 1 – Mathematics
Module 2 – Physics
Module 3 – Electrical Fundamentals
Module 4 – Electronic Fundamentals
Module 5 – Digital Techniques/ Electronic Instrument Systems
Module 6 – Aircraft Materials and Hardware
Module 7 – Maintenance Practices
Module 8 – Basic Aerodynamics
Module 9 – Human Factors
Module 10 – Aviation Legislation
Module 11 – Aeroplane Aerodynamics Structures and Systems
Module 15 – Gas Turbine Engines
Module 17 – Propeller
Module AA-02 Aviation English (as required)
Module AA15 – New Supervisor
PLUS AVIONICS SUBJECTS IN SEMESTER 4:
Module 1 – Mathematics
Module 2 – Physics
Module 3 – Electrical Fundamentals
Module 4 – Electronic Fundamentals
Module 5 – Digital Techniques/ Electronic Instrument Systems
Module 6 – Aircraft Materials and Hardware
Module 7 – Maintenance Practices
Module 8 – Basic Aerodynamics
Module 9 – Human Factors
Module 10 – Aviation Legislation
Module 13 – Aircraft Aerodynamics Structures and Systems
Module 14 – Propulsion

Centennial Scholarships

If you’ve got the talent and commitment to become an aerospace leader but need financial help, read on!!

In 2003, the Royal Aeronautical Society launched the Centennial Scholarship Fund in celebration of one hundred years of flight and to look forward to the next generation of aerospace pioneers and experts in the 21st Century.

Thanks to the generous support of the sponsors of the Fund, representing all areas of membership of the RAeS – from our Corporate Partners large and small, to individual members – the Fund has gone from strength to strength and we have been able to provide support to a number of outstanding students and team initiatives and will continue to do so in 2011 and beyond.

Awards made so far include support towards:

•Final year BEng and MEng students

•Postgraduate tuition fees to enable young people to undertake Master’s programmes such as Air Transport Management and Aerospace Vehicle Design

•Completion of aerospace-related post-doctorate research projects

•National programmes to encourage young people’s interest in the aviation industry and aerospace engineering.

Since the awards began in 2003, over 100 awards have been made with a value of more than £365,000.00

Aircraft Systems engineering video lecture

Already have a passion for aircraft, space travel and want to know what kinds of job opportunities are offered? Never even thought about aerospace as a potential place for your career?

Whether a passionate aviator, or simply curious to know more, this section introduces you to key areas of aerospace and aviation where you may be able to apply your talents.

From aerospace engineering to flying, from air transport operations to air traffic control, there may be a place for you in aerospace.
For in-depth information and case studies please visit: http://www.careersinaerospace.com

Study and Apprenticeships

In this section, find out more about entering the aerospace industry via university study, college courses or apprenticeships.  As you will see, from aerospace design to aircraft maintenance, to space courses and aviation management, there are lots of college and undergraduate degree courses on offer in the UK which can help prepare you for a career in aerospace.

However, it doesn’t end there. If you prefer a hands-on route with the chance to ‘earn while you learn’, apprenticeship opportunities also exist.

And with so many specialist areas of aerospace, you can also consider postgraduate study to gain expertise in fields such as aerodynamics, propulsion, satellite systems, or air transport management.

Study routes into aerospace

With a variety of complex career paths, from aerospace engineering to space mission analysis and airline management, there are many specialist degrees at UK universities which can help you develop the skills and knowledge for a career in aerospace.  With a strong tradition in aerospace engineering, over 33 universities in the UK offer aerospace engineering-related degrees alone, with international reputations for excellence in research and teaching, and using facilities such as flight simulators!

Aeronautical and Aerospace Engineering Study

This is about applying maths, science and technology to the research, design, manufacture and maintenance of airborne products and finding ways to continually improve existing models and create new concepts for clients such as airlines or aero-manufacturers.  Areas of study include aerodynamics, structures, fluid dynamics and avionics, and examining manufacturing processes or maintenance.  Traditionally, ‘aeronautical’ engineering has a mechanical focus, covering the various aspects of conventional flight in the atmosphere and the manufacture of aircraft. ‘Aerospace’ engineering encompasses aeronautical engineering together with other aspects, such as space, automated flight control systems and avionics. However, as courses are developed, the distinctions between the two are now disappearing, with course content often overlapping.

University Entry Requirements

Maths and Physics A levels/Scottish Highers, or equivalent, are a must for entry on to aerospace engineering courses. Grade requirements can be high, but vary between universities. You will also need a third subject and this could be another Science, or something complementary; Languages, for example, are very useful as so many aerospace companies have sites world-wide!

How long does it take?

A BEng is a Bachelor’s level degree, three years of full-time study, while the MEng involves an integrated additional year of study leading to a Master’s level qualification. The alternative is to study a separate Master’s (MSc) qualification after BEng level in a specialist subject field. Many universities offer work experience opportunities during the period of study, either through a one-year ‘industrial’ placement between the second and third year of the course, or through project work or summer placement schemes. Getting experience will really help you secure employment when you graduate!

Where can I study?

As the Royal Aeronautical Society provides an impartial service, we are unable recommend specific institutions. However, when making your selection, you are advised to look at the websites for universities with suitable courses and visit those which interest you the most. Take into consideration entry requirements aeronautical study facilities, employment rates for graduates and the institution’s links with industry, as well as practical concerns such as location and living expenses etc. In the case of entry requirements, you will need to contact institutions individually.

We have compiled lists of Further Education and Undergraduate courses relating to aerospace and aviation for you. Scroll down the page to download.

Accredited aerospace degrees

Some engineering degree courses are accredited by professional bodies such as the Royal Aeronautical Society. Engineers often work towards Chartered Engineering status during their career, in order to gain professional recognition. Accredited degrees assist engineers in this process.

Click here for our Accreditation Pages where you can find out about degrees currently accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Aircraft Engineering Study

In recent years, an increasing number of hands-on engineering courses have become available at university level. This is in addition to the courses available at Further Education (FE) level which often accompany apprenticeships and technician-based training.  Many courses incorporate work experience with aircraft maintenance suppliers, such as airlines or specialist maintenance companies, to help acquire the EASA licenses for aircraft maintenance engineers.

Scroll down the page to download a list of Further Education and Undergraduate courses relating to aerospace and aviation.

Other aerospace and aviation courses

In addition to the above, there are a number of specialist engineering courses which relate to the Space industry, many combine aeronautics with astronautics. Other relevant courses to aerospace engineering include mechanical, electronics/electrical and systems engineering degrees.

In addition, as specialist skills become necessary for increasingly complex aerospace business environment, degrees such as air transport management, aviation management and airline and airport management are now available focussing on the operational, regulatory and financial aspects of the industry.

And in both engineering and business disciplines, courses which combine pilot studies are also available, with the chance to gain a pilot’s licence (levels vary) at the same time as a degree.

Applying to university

UK students should apply for courses via UCAS http://www.ucas.ac.uk who manage the whole selection process for UK students entering undergraduate study. UCAS also organise a number of fairs across the country with study advice and the chance to meet universities as well as providing lots of advice on their website.  International students should contact UK universities directly for entry advice. Most universities have a specific International Office who can provide specialist advice about international qualifications and UK equivalencies for university entry. Look out also for British Council fairs throughout the world attended by UK universities.

Scholarships and Bursaries

Find out about the RAeS Centennial Scholarship Scheme at http://www.aerosociety.com/scholarships.

Going down the college route? The Engineering Technology Board (ETB) has teamed up with the Nuffield Foundation to launch a brand new Engineering Bursary Scheme for students at further education (FE) colleges. Find out more at http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/go/grants/nsbsc/page_550.html

Sample Airport Engineer CV Template

Airport engineers work in airports where they are responsible for engineering functions involving airport facilities and aircrafts.  They are responsible for planning and supervising efforts for expansion, development, and improvement of airports and their facilities.  Airport engineers must be knowledgeable of preparing engineering plans for facilities such as public parking, airport roadway systems, and ground transportation systems.  They must be adept in aviation industry policies and standards to ensure that airports are in compliance with these.  Airport engineers are highly specialized and they oversee the implementation of airport construction and development.

Sample Airport Engineer CV Template

Shawn Milton

Bignold Road, Forest Gate

London, E7 1EX

Phone:  123-4567-8901

shawnmilton@hotmail.com

Objective

Dynamic and highly knowledgeable licensed engineer seeking a challenging position as an airport engineer where my skills and knowledge can be maximized and honed.

 

Summary of Qualification

  • With six years of professional experience as an airport engineer.
  • Strong understanding of aviation standards and airport facilities mechanics.
  • Highly skilled in planning and managing staff to perform tasks.
  • Vast knowledge of aircrafts and airport facilities.
  • Excellent people management and time management skills.
  • Abreast of advances in aviation technology.
  • Willing to travel and work extended work hours.

Career Experience/Job History

2004 – Present:  Airport Engineer, London Airport

  • Coordinate engineering activities with state officials.
  • Prepare engineering plans to improve and develop airport.
  • Recommend ways to expand and redesign airport to suit passenger needs and be at par with latest technological advancements.

Education

1998 – 2003:  Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, London University

Professional reference will be furnished upon request.

Sample Aviation GSE Mechanic CV Template

Aviation ground support equipment (GSE) mechanics work in airport hangars or in companies specializing in the maintenance and repair of aircrafts.  They are responsible for performing maintenance duties to keep aircrafts in excellent working condition.  GSE mechanics must be trained in handling mechanical parts of the aircraft and must be highly knowledgeable of the structure of different kinds of aircraft.  They should be capable of doing tasks such as painting and fixing or installing heating and electrical devices in aircrafts.  GSE mechanics should possess knowledge in propane fuel systems, complex hydraulic and electrical systems, as well as diesel and gasoline engines.

Sample Aviation GSE Mechanic CV Template

Fred Adams

Alwyne Place, Islington

London, N1 4NL

Phone:  123-4567-8901

fredadams@yahoo.com

Objective

Detail-oriented and skilled professional seeking a position as a ground service equipment mechanic for an airport where I can practice my abilities and have opportunities for career growth.

Summary of Qualification

  • Four years of work experience as a ground service equipment mechanic.
  • Sound understanding of schematic diagrams for trouble-shooting purposes.
  • Team player and can work with minimum supervision.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills.
  • Capable of working in a demanding and stressful environment.
  • Excellent social and interpersonal skills.

Career Experience/Job History

2006 – Present:  Ground Service Equipment Mechanic, London Airport

  • Perform metal fabrication and welding jobs for aircrafts.
  • Inspect aircrafts and do needed repairs such as paint jobs, trouble-shooting engines, and fixing electrical systems.

Education

With a high school diploma and vocational training as an automotive service technician.

Professional reference will be furnished upon request.

Aircraft Mechanic CV Template

An aircraft mechanic is the person who is in charge of every mechanical detail relating to the aircraft and its operation. An aircraft mechanic has to be a highly expert person having adequate knowledge about the mechanical details required for the aircraft. This is because any faults in the mechanism of the aircraft can take away many lives. An aircraft mechanic CV template helps to provide professional as well as experience details of the person applying for the post.

Aircraft Mechanic CV Template

Carl Furman

Ellis Street 03980

Greece

Email- furman02@gmail.com

Objective

  • To find a rewarding position in the aircraft mechanical department and show expertise in the specific field.

Summary of Qualification

  • A trained expert in the maintenance, servicing and fixing problems for every nook and corner of the aircraft from tips to tail to wings to nose.
  • Knowledge and skill about the changing, replacement and removal of the component parts of the aircraft that are damaged or worn out.
  • Expert in landing gear, the exterior and interior, proper lubrication and refueling of the aircraft in time and in the proper way.
  • Certified in the field of powering the aircraft and matters relating to the aircraft engine.

Education

2000

Graduated 160 hours program

Technical Aircraft Maintenance School

UK

2002

Graduated 120 hour program

Fairchild Air Force Institute

Greece

2002-2006

Hill Force Institute of Aviation Technology

Aeronautical Engineering

Greece

Career Experience

  • Jet Airways- 2006-2008

[Deputy Mechanical Engineer]

  • British Airlines- Present

[Deputy Chief Aircraft Engineer]

Achievements

  • Achieved the best award for maintenance of the aircraft fuelling in 2007

Professional references upon request.

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